Part 2 of this bathroom redo. Here’s the link to the first part with some before pictures: https://www.thomashepburn.ca/2018/02/peelandstick/

The problem is not all the nails are rusty. This old style plank subfloor was nailed down without glue. The trouble is that you get nail pop which leads to squeaky floors. It’s unusual to see diagonal plank subfloors in a house built in 1971. However that’s the case here. Usually houses built from the 1970s on have sheet OSB subfloor. I’m finding a lot of outdated building methods in this duplex

Solution: check all planks with hammer slam. pull loose nails and screw down

checkpoint subfloor cleaning

I call this a checkpoint. Every project needs checkpoints. Some people do these without even thinking about it. ( See @johnataction for business coaching.) It’s usually when I pull out my vacuum cleaner. I check to see if there’s any items that have been missed; possibly additional costs. Measurements are taken at this point and plans for the new build, material options are considered – basically “Are we on track with this project? ” After I’ve done this it’s time to go shopping. If it’s a paying job I enjoy it since I’m spending someone else’s money. In this case it’s my own bathroom. In either case I’m very conscious of value and price of materials.

Websites today are a lot more like software than static pages of text and pictures. Web developers use CMS (Content Management Systems) for building websites (e.g. this site uses WordPress).   There are dozens of website CMS applications

Like any software, you must continuously update it.  The site that’s visible to the public might not change but the CMS in the background must continuously patch security holes and improve features as the internet evolves.  Most CMS have a very simple upgrading methodology.  Some are automatic.

If the look of your site doesn’t change, there is a downside as well.  A CMS makes it so easy to change/update/improve a website that it’s expected.  It’s shows that your company and/or you are alive.  Google ranks your page, in part, by how recently the pages have changed.  It doesn’t have to be a big change.  Sometimes I just go through my site and improve grammatical stuff’n’stuff. ( I’ll fix that later).

I was looking at the WordPress support pages recently and found a couple of jewels. for my own benefit and for potential clients I’ll post the WordPress calendar.

WordPress CMS Calendar

January
  • Upgrade or Update WordPress
  • Check for new Plugins
  • Add New Content
February
  • Add New ContentClean out Plugins
  • Check Site Statistics
  • Check Site’s Link Popularity and Search Engine Ranking
  • Backup Database and Site
March
  • Clean up and/or Try New Theme
  • Review Content and Check Links
April
  • Clean Out or Update Graphics and Photographs
  • Add New Content
  • Check Site Statistics
  • Submit Site to Search Engines
  • Backup Database and Site
May
  • Check for Dead Links
  • Add New Content
June
  • Add New Content
  • Check Site Statistics
  • Check Site’s Link Popularity and Search Engine Ranking
  • Backup Database and Site
July
  • Upgrade or Update WordPress
  • Check Advertising
  • Add New Content
August
  • Check for New Plugins
  • Clean Out Old Plugins
  • Add New Content
  • Check Site Statistics
  • Backup Database and Site
September
  • Clean or Renew Themes
  • Validate Web Pages and CSS
  • Add New Content
  • Submit Site to Search Engines
  • Check Advertising
October
  • Optimize Web Pages and CSS
  • Add New Content
  • Check Site Statistics
  • Backup Database and Site
November
  • Add New Content
  • Check Site’s Link Popularity and Search Engine Ranking
December
  • Check Site Statistics
  • Add New Content
  • Backup Database and Site

The table has been adapted from here:  http://codex.wordpress.org/WordPress_Site_Maintenance

I’m quite a fan of having sharp tools. They get dull too quickly, which I tried to solve by not using them. This only made work go very slowly. The next thing I tried was developing a way to sharpen dull tools quickly, at the job-site. My favorite is the diamond plates from princessauto.com. They are cheap and they are fast, but recently I borrowed an idea I found in Shopnotes Magazine. I’ll talk about that later. What I want to talk about is my Suehiro water stones.

In the workshop I can get seriously sharp edges on my tools with the help of Japan, or at least whoever makes these Japanese water stones. Suehiro water stones are imported by Woodcraft Industries International Inc. They are an excellent sharpening medium. I’ve been using this stone for a couple of months and can’t remember life without it. At 1200 grit it gives an almost mirror-like finish on the steel. I’ve just bought another combination waterstone that has #1200 on one side and #6000 on the other. I’m looking forward to using it soon.

The cover of the Suehiro water stone I use for sharpening toolsI think that the word “Deluxe” is used for Suehiro’s extra wide stones. The #1200 is 2 7/8 inches wide, but my combination stone is only 2 1/8 inches wide

My diamond lapping plates from Princess Auto wore out recently. They were cheap and are still available at a very affordable price. However, I found another way to sharpen my tools at the jobsite that I am going to try. I found a supplier of Autobody peel-and-stick sanding pads that are #800 & #1200 grit. I also found a shop that makes granite counter tops. The off-cuts are ideal as a backer for the sanding pads. It’s a disposable honing stone.  If you cannot find peel-and-stick sanding pads, I recommend using a spray adhesive from either 3M or Elmers.

Super 77 from 3M products.
“Super 77”, a general purpose spray adhesive from 3M