I’ve been wondering what to call our library in the basement. Really it’s not that big, but I have yet to count the books. They have been sorted into a fiction side (the left) and the non-fiction side. Below this level, we sorted out some major topics, such as religion ( it’s near the middle but on the left side too). There is a shelf containing mostly outdoors subject material.

In my blog I’ve been using Openlibrary.org to show books that I’ve been reading. Some come from my personal library. I called it the “undiscovered library”, and in another post I called it the “Forgotten Library” and still another time I called it the “Lost Library”. I should explain the origins of this particular collections of books. It might explain the strange titles I’ve given the wall of books.

My grandfather had a good collection of books. My other grandfather had books too. When these ancestors passed away, the books were given to my parents. I grew up in a small house where the master bedroom had one wall covered in books. that kind of shelf where books were sideways, crammed in until every spot was filled with a book of some size or another. The floor in front of the bookshelf had boxes of books. There was a trunk of books that stayed in the garage, there was no room in the house for any more books. I grew up and thought any dwelling ought to have a good collection of books, so I bought books. I read most of the books I bought but rarely gave them away.

Then my parents passed away and I got all the books – I was the only one willing to pay the shipping fee. Three crates came to my house, each weighing around 700 pounds.  Add to this all the books I’ve collected and you have a lot of books!  Sadly, we had to give a hard line to the books we kept out of the crates.  Most of my mother’s paperback novels got donated ( Nancy Drew anyone?).  My father’s paperback fiction novels got donated (Aces over Berlin anyone?).  Today, I’ve got room for the books – Okay, some of the books. I now have enough books to last until paper is outlawed. My daughter has picked up the torch of buying books. I, on the other hand, was given a $25 Chapter’s gift card over a year ago and still have $14 left on it. Why should I go out and buy another book?  There’s hundreds I have not read sitting in the… Undiscovered Library.

That’s the name:  The Undiscovered Library.

Book’em

The Handyman's Book The Handyman’s Book: Essential Woodworking Tools and TechniquesPaul N. Hasluck; Ten Speed Press 2001WorldCatLibraryThingGoogle BooksBookFinder 

This book is a re-print.  Originally printed in 1903, it was a thorough book on essential woodworking tools and techniques.  More than 2500 illustrations. I love the book.